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20130416
20130424
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
. private equity is certainly doing well in this environment. i'm, i guess, a little surprised that we haven't seen more deals, given the fact that rates are at such low levels. shouldn't we be seeing a whole host of deal flow and deal activity? >> we should, and we may. i guess, the opposite side of a coin of a buoyant stock market is higher evaluations and less attractive targets in the public arena. as a stock holder, and i was glad to see blackstone back off from a bid on dell. but, you know, these companies are kind of out of the mainstream. if you're a stock holder, you're actually a unit holder. you get a k-1 form, as if you were a limited partner in almost a hedge fund. the accounting is eccentric, because, well, because gap doesn't quite do these companies justice. so you have to look at this so-called economic net income. and there's this seeming paradox of private equity companies being in the private market. and if private equities are so great, why are they public? there's a lot of bad will, i think, towards these companies, but they offer that thing that is most scarce today in
words of calm. a day later, how is this sinking in? >> well, i think obviously the city, the environment around the city is still in a state of shock. the city will not be business as usual today. many of the streets around us you can see have been closed off, back bay, the entire area of the finish line is closed off and shut down. but like any city like new york, after september 11th, like any city in this country, people are resilient, we'll go on. >> yesterday was a special day for people outside of boston, can you explain? >> oh, joe. >> you know, the sox play, it's a holiday in boston, actually. >> it's a holiday. >> the sox play in the afternoon. you were there with your son. >> it's a traditional holiday. it's perhaps the greatest day for the city during the course of the year. it's a day when the entire city wears a smile. it's a day when hundreds of thousands of people arrive here from literally around the globe and certainly around the nation to run, first, in the boston marathon, 26 miles in massachusetts, to the boylston finish line. the game concludes just as the middle of
a weapon that is miniaturized but also can survive and function in a very stressful environment. and the important thing here is that in terms of their test history, north korea has never successfully tested a ballistic missile warhead to a range greater than 1300 kilometers. okay, then the third challenge is what missiles they have and what can they do. at the low end of the scale, the north koreans have 5-600 swan missiles which are basically a variant of the scud first flown by the soviets pack in the 1950s. and those give north korea the ability to cover targets pretty much in most of south korea. then there's the no-dong missile which has a range of 1300 kilometers, that allows coverage of targets in japan as well as south korea. but when you move beyond that, you get into a series of missiles that really cannot be regarded as proven. the focus of the last couple of weeks has been on this missile, two were reportedly moved towards the coast of north korea. there was some speculation that today in honor of the birthday there might be a launch. in this missile's supposed to h
to make sure it fosters an environment where we can have small, medium and large banks, where we can have community banks that thrive, regional banks that tlooip thrive and large global banks. incidentally, andrew, if you look at the largest 50 banks, only about a half dozen are u.s. banks and incidentally, of the top 20 or 25 banks, our largest is number ten. so in terms of the size of our banks vis-a-vis our overall economy, much smaller than our international fears. >> but what about the idea that it's not just the banks. it's the financial companies, the insurance companies -- >> in addition to banks, we do have insurance companies in the financial services forum. >> there have been a lot of questions raised about all the regulations that were dropped on the banks when some of these other companies, like aig, for example, they were a huge problem and they're not going to be regulated in quite the same way. there's talk about cracking down on the insurer, as well. >> in the case of the nonbank, the group that was created under dodd-frank, the fsoc, is looking to designate a number of t
's eve, we do that in a very controlled environment. but in a marathon, we have 26 miles. >> brian: it's impossible, isn't it? >> steve: everybody has one. >> brian: but you can secure the finish line, or major points, the start or finish. do you feel confident about that? >> well, it depends. it's a big open area. you have thousands of people who are running. they're bringing their own clothing. usually what happens is they'll take some -- whatever they wear to the start of the race. they'll take that, put it in the vehicle. it's transported to the finish line. it's difficult to control. there is no easy answers, no guarantees, that's for sure. >> gretchen: when this first happened, i think a lot of people thought about new york city and 9-11, of course. but one of the things i thought a lot about was all the attacks that you thwarted. so how do you continue to be so successful at that, because there is so much discussion about it only takes one. >> right. they only have to be successful once. >> gretchen: how do you continue to be successful in new york? >> if we have some luck and w
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)